Tech Companies Must Take Responsibility for AI ‘Disinformation’, Says Defamation Lawyer

"Renowned Defamation Lawyer Paul Tweed Urges Accountability for Tech Giants like Microsoft in the Spread of AI Disinformation, Citing Concerns from News Publishers"

Irish defamation lawyer Paul Tweed has expressed concerns about the spread of “disinformation” through generative AI, calling for companies like Microsoft to be held accountable. Tweed, who is the founder of W P Tweed & Co and an expert in media law and reputation management, has heard from news publishers and other organisations about the misleading information being churned out by AI chatbots. He believes that key players, for commercial or political reasons, are using these chatbots to spread disinformation. However, Tweed has also said that Irish law is not equipped to deal with the issues arising from the growing use of AI.

Tweed has questioned who should be held accountable for the spread of misleading information through AI, asking whether it is possible to sue a robot. He has used Microsoft as an example of a company that should be liable for the spread of such information, given its investment in OpenAI, the company that created the leading AI chatbot ChatGPT. Tweed argues that big tech companies should be subject to the law like everyone else.

Tweed has also commented on the issue of tax tourism, whereby big tech companies come to Ireland to take advantage of its tax system. He has said that this is not necessarily a bad thing for the Irish economy, but that such companies should not be treated any differently from the owners of the Irish Examiner, for example. He believes that introducing laws that would impact big tech firms would not scare them off, and that they must be subject to the law like everyone else.

Meanwhile, last week MEPs came a step closer to passing new rules regulating artificial intelligence tools such as ChatGPT, following a crunch vote. The European Union’s highly anticipated AI Act looks set to be the world’s first comprehensive legislation governing the technology, with new rules around the use of facial recognition, biometric surveillance, and other AI applications. This legislation will be an important step in addressing the issues raised by Tweed and others about the spread of disinformation through AI.

Tweed’s concerns about the spread of disinformation through AI are shared by many in the media and technology industries. The use of AI chatbots to spread misleading information has become increasingly prevalent, with some experts warning that this could have serious consequences for democracy and public trust in the media. The issue of accountability is a complex one, with many arguing that it is difficult to hold companies responsible for the actions of their AI systems. However, as AI becomes more sophisticated and more widely used, it is clear that new laws and regulations will be needed to address the challenges it presents.

In conclusion, the issue of disinformation spread through AI is a growing concern for many, including defamation lawyer Paul Tweed. He has called for big tech companies like Microsoft to be held accountable for the spread of misleading information through AI chatbots. While Irish law is not currently equipped to deal with this issue, new legislation is being developed at the European Union level that will regulate the use of AI tools like ChatGPT. This legislation will be an important step in addressing the challenges presented by AI and ensuring that companies are held accountable for their actions.

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